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Seven Rules For Effective Selling Online

 

 

 

 

The Seven Rules For Effective Selling Online & Services, Commodities,

and

Products: What's The Difference? Why Is This Important?

 

The Seven Rules For Effective Selling Online

Mechanics may change but basic rules don't. Why? Technology changes but people remain basically the same. It's not the people that change; it's their environment.

The rules are simple.

1. Put the customer first. Stand in their shoes. This means two things.

First, this means you should ask yourself these questions: What can I offer that they need? What do they need that I have to give? Don't make the mistake of assuming you know the answer. For example, don't produce a lot of something without first testing a small batch to discover if it will sell. Find your niche market by first learning what they need, what products, commodities and services, and then match what they need to your expertise and interests.

Second, this means you must never argue with a customer. I'm sure you've heard this before, but you still do it. So why stop? Why is this important?

Arguing is criticism. Criticism in any form is demoralizing and totally counterproductive. You don't want your customers doubting themselves, or their choices. You don't want them to doubt their wisdom in choosing you! Instead, increase their self-confidence: praise their decisions. Never imply in any way, shape, or form that they're wrong, or stupid. When a choice isn't in their best interests, don't criticise; just demonstrate a better alternative. Teach by example. Praise their efforts.

2. Make it easy for customers to find you; tell them you have what they need. Don't assume customers will find you just because you have what they need. Tell everyone you know what you have, and tell them to tell everyone they know, frequently and often.

3. Decide whether you're selling a service, a commodity, or a product. If you don't know the difference, read the article below, following this one. This decision determines everything about how you sell what you have. Know the difference between these three and don't confuse them, and don't bit off more than you can chew by attempting more than one of them at a time.

Make a decision, stick to it, and have patience. Again, find your natural niche by matching your expertise and interests to what other people need.

Think long term gain. Persevere. This is especially important when you're a struggling artist. Struggling artists are often tempted to sell multiples to make money; this can harm their establishing a one-of-a-kind exclusive reputation that's the pre-requisite for selling expensive originals.

4. Being first or being best: both have inherent challenges.

5. Patience and perseverance. Be patient, and persevering.

6. Less is more. Never sacrifice quality for quantity or perfecting details for speed. In spite of what you may hear about this being a "numbers game", care and attention to detail is essential to success.

7. Stay flexible so you can adjust to change. While you need to build and establish a stable structure, don't let your routines become too rigid. You should be able to adjust to sudden unexpected changes in external circumstances. Change is the only constant.

 

Services, Commodities, and Products: What's The Difference? Why Is This Important?

Services require your personal effort in helping others. Examples of businesses selling a service include, but are not limited to, a doctor's office, lawyer's office, an accountant, a gym or health spa, and the US Postal Service.

Commodities are fungible goods, things that are essentially interchangeable. They're treated as if they're equivalent to each other. For example, when I lend you $1.00, any of the $1.00 bills you have can be used to pay me back; I don't care which one you give me. Commodities are groups of fungible goods, often mass produced, in quantity. A product is a one of a kind original creation, in form, thought or action. It can be something physical but can also be something mental such as an idea, invention, improvement, process, system, or method. It can be a physical process, such as a legal service, or specific surgical procedure.

A product can be protected legally as a unique entity, for example with a trademark. A product is one unique thing defining a class of its' own. Commodities cannot be legally protected in this way, because by definition, they're not unique. They're not in a class of their own. They're groups, or classes, of similar interchangeable things.

While a product can lead to the creation of commodities, the opposite, by definition, is not true. A commodity is a common item, in common usage, belonging to a group of interchangeable common items, any of which can substitute for any of the others. By definition, a commodity is common, not unique, is fungible, interchangeable with others from the same or similar group or class.

Commodities and products are not the same thing. They're not synonymous terms. They refer to very different situations. These terms are not fungible.

For the purposes of marketing and selling to the general public, business and markets ignore the difference between commodities and products. Business and markets use confusing terminology that obfuscates and blurs this clear distinction.

For example, in retailing, products are called merchandise, but merchandise is a general term that doesn't tell you whether something is a mass produced replaceable interchangeable commodity or a one of a kind unique product. The difference between commodity and product isn't represented clearly to the general public.

When experts use terminology for the public that blurs this distinction, the public will follow suit and also blur the distinction. When the public is lead to believe that commodities and products are the same thing, the public perceives commodities and products as fungible, equal, interchangeable, and as having the same value.

An environment emerges, with "Collectibles" categories, sorting specific commodities into classes, grouped by relative value. Interchangeable items, originally produced in mass quantity, are sorted into classes and sub-groups of relative value. The value of anything truly original becomes determined by how similar its' resemblance is to some mass produced commodity, which of course, completely misses the point of the distinction. Value in this environment is determined by inherently interchangeable parts carefully classified into standardized groups, not by intrinsic uniqueness.

This blurs the distinction between commodity and product even further, encouraging the false perception that by sorting mass produced interchangeable fungible items into smaller groups, they become unique, original, irreproducible products, in a class of their own. How ironic that the general public has no idea how funny this is.

You can't change commodities into products by sorting them, by wishing them so. A16th century nursery rhyme proverb states this succinctly: If wishes were horses, beggars would ride. By eliminating the difference and equating the two, you lose what you most need to perceive, those truly unique original inventive ways of thinking that created the products forming the basis for commodities in the first place.

We hope this information is helpful to you. Thanks for reading. Merci de votre visite.

 



All Content is © Debra Spencer, Suit Yourself™ International. Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved.
Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

 

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All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

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All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. ~ Winston Churchill