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Tara

 

 

 

TARA  

A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO AN EMANATION OF AVALOKITESHVARA, THE EMBODIMENT OF COMPASSION AND ACTION

A lotus-bearing goddess may represent almost any female deity. Her hands, however, are in vitarka jnana mudras with a lotus. These are the indications she is Tara, an emanation of Avalokiteshvara, the embodiment of Compassion.The beloved Dalai Lama is the incarnate manifestation of Avalokiteshvara.Tara is the great savior and goddess of mercy in the Mahayana tradition. There are 21 Forms of Tara, and within those 21, there are even more subsets and variations.

Tara is actually the generic name for a group of bodhisattvas who represent different aspects of the same set of Buddha qualities of combining compassion and action. A Bodhisattva is any enlightened being who has accumulated sufficient wisdom and merit to achieve enlightenment, but who instead chooses to remain amongst the world of suffering until all beings can be saved from it.

Before she was adopted by Buddhism, Tara was worshipped in Hinduism as a manifestation of the goddess Parvati.

The feminine principle was not venerated in Buddhism until the fourth century CE, and Tara probably entered Buddhism around the sixth century CE.

In Buddhist tradition, Tara is the female aspect of Avalokiteshvara ( Chenrezig ) and his consort. She was born from his tears of compassion over sentient being's suffering. There are many forms of the Bodhisattva Tara and her qualities; "In Praise of the 21 Taras" is recited by all 4 sects of Tibetan Buddhism. In the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism, Tara is a female Bodhisattva considered the mother of liberation, representing virtues of success and achievement. As a Tibetan Tantric deity, she is invoked to help develop compassion and an understanding of emptiness.

Here are some of the forms of Tara:

Green Tara, known as the Buddha of enlightened activity.

White Tara, known for compassion, long life, healing and serenity, as The Wish-fulfilling Wheel, or Cintachakra.

Red Tara, of fierce aspect and associated with magnetizing all good things.

Black Tara, associated with power.

Yellow Tara, associated with wealth and prosperity.

Blue Tara, associated with the transmutation of anger.

Cittamani Tara is a form of Tara widely practiced at the level of Highest Yoga Tantra in the Gelug School of Tibetan Buddhism. She is portrayed as green and is often conflated with Green Tara.

Conflation occurs when the identities of two or more individuals, concepts, or places, sharing some characteristics of one another, become confused until there seems to be only a single identity; the differences appear to become lost.

Khadiravani Tara , or Tara of the teak forest, appeared to Nagarjuna in the Khadiravani forest of South India and is sometimes referred to as the "22nd Tara".

 

Green Tara is depicted above in the traditional manner. She rests in a posture depicting both ease and readiness for action. White Tara, by contrast, is traditionally depicted as seated in diamond lotus position with both soles of her feet pointed upward. While Green Tara's left leg is folded in a contemplative position, White Tara's right leg is partly outstretched, ready to spring. Her left hand is in the refuge-granting mudra and her right hand in the gift-granting mudra. In her hands she also holds closed blue lotus flowers , utpalas, symbolizing purity and power. She has blue eyes; Tibetans depicted statues with blue eyes because blue eyes were rarely seen in their country and they were therefore considered special.

Tara is adorned with the rich jewels of a bodhisattva, including the 5-Pointed Crown, as shown in the images above and below. The 5-Pointed Crown worn by Tara represents the 5 Dhyani Buddhas. In Vajrayana Buddhism, the Five Dhyani Buddhas are representations of the five qualities of the Buddha. Dhyani is Sanskrit and means "concentration".

The Dhyani Buddhas are also known as the Five Wisdom Buddhas (gochinyorai), the Five Great Buddhas and the Five Jinas (Sanskrit for "conqueror" or "victor"). In English, Tara means "rescuer". Tara (Sanskrit: Tara) is also known as Arya Tara , and Jetsun Dolma (Tibetan language: rje btsun sgrol ma). In Japan, Tara is a bodhisattva called Tarani Bosatsu who embodies both the white and green forms of the Tibetan Tara. Tara is not often to be found in any form in China, interestingly enough.

 


We hope this information is helpful to you. Thanks for reading. Merci de votre visite.

 



All Content is © Debra Spencer, Suit Yourself™ International. Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved.
Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

 

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All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.

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All Content is ©2019 Debra Spencer, Appanage™at www.suityourself.international Suit Yourself ™ International, 120 Pendleton Point, Islesboro Island, Maine, 04848, USA 44n31 68w91 Technical Library FAQ Index ISSN 2474-820X. All Rights Reserved. Please do not reproduce in part or in whole without express written consent. Thank you.
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